terminology

What type of user interface does GNOME Terminal have?

What type of user interface does GNOME Terminal have? I read here that a terminal emulator is just a wrapper program that runs a (command-line) shell. So we can type different commands into this shell (which runs inside a terminal application). In particular, we can use commands to launch different applications. And each application has …

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Confusion about memory management terminology (Linux)

Confusion about memory management terminology (Linux) I want to know a better way of "naming things" (regarding memory management in linux), to avoid a reader of a writting of mine to misunderstood something, but also avoid long-phrases each time. I call file-backed to a page that, in case of reclaim, can be just discarded because …

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Significance of "ctl" in "systemctl"

Significance of "ctl" in "systemctl" Is "ctl" in systemctl an acronym for "control"? I couldn’t find the meaning of systemctl on Wikipedia. Asked By: user371780 || Source $ man systemctl | head NAME systemctl – Control the systemd system and service manager "long name" is not a thing. Read the man page before you bother …

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Is there a generic term for working with files and directories?

Is there a generic term for working with files and directories? I was wondering if there is a generic term that describes working with or manipulating files and directories that includes all the different ways of manipulating files? Similar to the term coding that describes the process of creating or writing a program with some …

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YANKING in Vim and Bash – are they opposite?

YANKING in Vim and Bash – are they opposite? I have a very short question that I couldn’t really find anywhere else upon googling, though to me this feels like a very natural question to ask, so maybe it’s just I’m missing out on something. So the word YANK feels like it means the opposite …

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Is Docker an emulator? If not, why not?

Is Docker an emulator? If not, why not? Is Docker an emulator? If not, why not? It emulates an operating system in a certain state/mode, isn’t it? Asked By: hamza || Source Docker is a container system. It separates the operating system into a host operating system and multiple pieces that run isolated pieces of …

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What is the system distribution in the Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL)?

What is the system distribution in the Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL)? wsl.exe help (shown by wsl.exe –help) talks about "the system distribution": Options: … –system Launches a shell for the system distribution. What is it? Searching in WSL docs for "system distribution" gave me only the following hit in the section How to manage …

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What is die hard in linux? is there a die soft?

What is die hard in linux? is there a die soft? https://github.com/torvalds/linux/blob/bf272460d744112bacd4c4d562592decbf0edf64/arch/x86/kernel/cpu/mce/core.c#L1543 if ((m.cs & 3) == 3) { /* If this triggers there is no way to recover. Die hard. */ BUG_ON(!on_thread_stack() || !user_mode(regs)); as above, what is die hard? what is die soft? Will the rest of the code continues running after BUG_ON() …

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How to know what are commands, system calls, bash built-ins, etc?

How to know what are commands, system calls, bash built-ins, etc? A coworker recently asked "What is man"? After being informed that not all things accessible from the Bash CLI are commands, I was wary to call man a command. man man just calls it an interface: NAME man – an interface to the on-line …

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Terminology: Clarification of the words network 'link', 'device', 'interface'

Terminology: Clarification of the words network 'link', 'device', 'interface' Cut to the chase: So which is it? Is an IP assigned to an interface, link, or device? What distinguishes these three things? Caveat: This is a critical review of the iproute2 utilities or documentation thereof, to gain a better understanding of them (mainly, ip). It …

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What is the difference between a byte and a character (at least *nixwise)?

What is the difference between a byte and a character (at least *nixwise)? I understand that any character is comprised of one or more byte/s. If I am not mistaken, at least in *nix operating systems, a character will generally (or totally?) be comprised of only one byte. What is the difference between a byte …

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What does the letter 'u' mean in umask?

What does the letter 'u' mean in umask? Is it “user mask” or something? Wikipedia does not have details, but says the feature has been in Unix since 1978. POSIX just says it is the “file mode creation mask”. Asked By: Lassi || Source Nothing in man umask, but in bash help umask says Sets …

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What does "inet" stand for in the ip utility?

What does "inet" stand for in the ip utility? I would assume ‘inet‘ stands for internet ip address, but is that correct? (And ‘inet6‘ being internet ip address v.6.) ip a yields a list of virtual (and physical?) network devices. When an IP address is mapped to a device, it is displayed as 1: lo: …

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Understanding piped commands in Unix/Linux

Understanding piped commands in Unix/Linux I have two simple programs: A and B. A would run first, then B gets the “stdout” of A and uses it as its “stdin”. Assume I am using a GNU/Linux operating system and the simplest possible way to do this would be: ./A | ./B If I had to describe this …

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What are X server, display and screen?

What are X server, display and screen? From https://unix.stackexchange.com/a/17278/674 If you run ssh -X localhost, you should see that $DISPLAY is (probably) localhost:10.0. Contrast with :0.0, which is the value when you’re not connected over SSH. (The .0 part may be omitted; it’s a screen number, but multiple screens are rarely used.) There are two …

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Why is the Nginx webserver called a "reverse proxy"?

Why is the Nginx webserver called a "reverse proxy"? Why is the Nginx webserver called a “reverse proxy”? I know any “proxy” to be a “medium” and this touches a more basic question of “how can a medium be forward or reverse”. Asked By: user149572 || Source A typical “forward” proxy (commonly just called “proxy”) …

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What does "process accounting" mean in Linux?

What does "process accounting" mean in Linux? I’m working with Docker in action‘s book, and I have seen the term “process accounting” several times. I am in a containerization of the application context. I would like to know more about this concept of process accounting. Google found me some finance accounting articles; I am looking …

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command line terminology: what are these parts of a command called?

command line terminology: what are these parts of a command called? At the command line I often use “simple” commands like mv foo/bar baz/bar but I don’t know what to call all the parts of this: ┌1┐ ┌──2───┐ git checkout master │ └──────3──────┘ └───────4─────────┘ I (think I) know that 1 is a command and 2‘s …

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What do snap, snapd and Snappy refer to?

What do snap, snapd and Snappy refer to? I understand (broadly) how snap packaging works. But what precisely do each of “snap”, “snapd” and “Snappy” refer to? It seems like “snap” refers to many things (package format, terminal command…), “snapd” is a specific tool and “Snappy” is no longer used [1] [2]? [1]: The only …

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