If you ^Z from a process, it gets "stopped". How do you switch back in?

I accidentally “stopped” my telnet process. Now I can neither “switch back” into it, nor can I kill it (it won’t respond to kill 92929, where 92929 is the processid.)

So, my question is, if you have a stopped process on linux command line, how do you switch back into it, or kill it, without having to resort to kill -9?

Asked By: bobobobo

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The easiest way is to run fg to bring it to the foreground:

$ help fg
fg: fg [job_spec]
    Move job to the foreground.

    Place the job identified by JOB_SPEC in the foreground, making it the
    current job.  If JOB_SPEC is not present, the shell's notion of the
    current job is used.

    Exit Status:
    Status of command placed in foreground, or failure if an error occurs.

Alternatively, you can run bg to have it continue in the background:

$ help bg
bg: bg [job_spec ...]
    Move jobs to the background.

    Place the jobs identified by each JOB_SPEC in the background, as if they
    had been started with `&'.  If JOB_SPEC is not present, the shell's notion
    of the current job is used.

    Exit Status:
    Returns success unless job control is not enabled or an error occurs.

If you have just hit Ctrl Z, then to bring the job back just run fg with no arguments.

Answered By: terdon

You can use jobs to list the suspended process. Take the example. Start with a process:

$ sleep 3000  

Then you suspend the process:

^Z
[1]+  Stopped                 sleep 3000

You can list the process:

$ jobs
[1]+  Stopped                 sleep 3000

and bring it back to the foreground:

$ fg %1
sleep 3000

The %1 corresponds to the [1] listed with the jobs command.

Answered By: Luis

You should be able to re-start a suspended process by using the kill command to send the process the CONTINUE signal, from the command-line, thus:

kill -CONT 92929
Answered By: Geeb